Power of One

At Holy Trinity, our faith and Ignatian tradition call us to build a more just world that upholds dignity, equality and access to social and economic opportunity for all. Our social justice ministry supports and facilitates living a life of justice and peace, and once a year we try to do this together as a parish. We call it the Power of One.

This year, we will celebrate and serve together on Saturday, June 15 as part of Trinity weekend. Opportunities for service around the DC area are available throughout the day. Read more about the organizations and opportunities for service below before you sign up to volunteer.

Any questions can be directed to Kate Tromble, ktromble@trinity.org.

A Wider Circle

About
A Wider Circle’s mission is to end poverty by inspiring, fostering, and measuring individual and community level change. Their holistic approach focuses on the creation of stable homes; comprehensive, individualized support to move families to economic self-sufficiency; neighborhood revitalization; and the creation of greater awareness and engagement by the community, as a whole. Their efforts focus on the provision of basic need items, workforce development, wraparound support, and neighborhood revitalization. A Wider Circle furnishes the homes of more than 4,000 families per year, helping to create the stability and dignity that everyone deserves. Learn more about A Wider Circle.

Serve
At A Wider Circle, volunteers will sort household goods and furniture in the organization’s warehouse. They may also assist clients in finding items and help load furniture into family’s cars. They need help sorting through donations to ensure that they are only redistributing items that are in what they call “dignity condition” - free of damages, keeping showrooms stocked, and assisting clients as they are selecting items to take home. Volunteers will be working right alongside the people who A Wider Circle serves. Volunteers of all ages and abilities are welcome.

Bread for the City

About
Bread for the City helps Washington, DC residents living with low income to develop their power to determine the future of their own communities. They provide food, clothing, medical care, and legal and social services to reduce the burden of poverty. They seek justice through community organizing and public advocacy. They work to uproot racism, a major cause of poverty. They are committed to treating their clients with the dignity and respect that all people deserve. Learn more about Bread for the City.

Serve
Sort clothing at Bread for the City's Northwest Center. All ages welcome; children, teens must be accompanied by an adult. 1525 7th Street NW, Washington, DC.

Christ House

About
Christ House provides comprehensive health care to sick, homeless men and women in DC after their release from local hospitals, clinics, or shelters. Patients are admitted to Christ House from area hospitals, shelters, clinics, and medical outreach projects. They suffer from a variety of illnesses and injuries including cancer, hypertension and stroke, liver disease, kidney failure, diabetes and related amputations, HIV/AIDS, respiratory disease, major lacerations, fractures, and ulcerations of the skin. Many are malnourished, anemic, depressed, and desperately disconnected from healthy sources of support. Learn more about Christ House.

Serve
At Christ House, volunteers will prepare and serve dinner for the patients at Christ House, a faith-based residential medical facility in Northwest Washington, DC. Volunteers will assist with preparation, serving, and cleanup for meals for people who do not have a home and are patients at Christ House. Volunteers will serve from 5-7pm.

DC Diaper Bank

About
The Greater DC Diaper Bank empowers families and individuals in need throughout DC, Maryland, and Virginia by providing an adequate and reliable source for basic baby needs and personal hygiene products. They believe we can create, through actions large and small, collective and individual, a community in which families have all they need to thrive. Their programs include a diaper distribution network, a baby pantry, and a nursery program. Learn more about the DC Diaper Bank.

Serve
Create diaper kits in Holy Trinity's McKenna Hall. There are no age restrictions for volunteers.

Dumbarton Oaks Park Conservancy

About
Dumbarton Oaks Park Conservancy is a non-profit organization established in 2010 that is working to restore one of the United States of America’s ten greatest garden landscape designs, the 27-acre Dumbarton Oaks Park (the Park), formerly part of the Dumbarton Oaks estate in Georgetown, Washington, DC. The estate is a milestone in the history of American landscape architecture and a landmark in our social history, as it represents the finest work of Beatrix Farrand, America’s first professional female landscape architect. Farrand was one of eleven founding members (the only female founding member) of the American Society of Landscape Architects and is regarded as one of America’s foremost landscape practitioners of the 20th century. She shattered the glass ceiling in her profession, and this is her crowning achievement.

Serve
Volunteers will learn about and pull invasive species in the park. There will also be snacks and a fun break. 31st & R St, NW, look for the path 200 ft east of R St with sign "Dumbarton Oaks Park, Open Dawn to Dusk."

Iona Senior Services

About
Iona Senior Services supports people as they experience the challenges and opportunities of aging. They educate, advocate, and provide community-based services to help people age well and live well. They also work with caregivers of those who are aging to help them assist their loved ones in aging well. Iona supports people as they experience the challenges and opportunities of aging. Learn more about Iona Senior Services.

Serve
Volunteers deliver meals to a route of approximately seven homebound Iona clients in Northwest D.C., 4125 Albermarle St, NW, Washington, DC 20016.

Jubilee Jobs

About
Jubilee Jobs has been connecting employers across the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area with qualified and well-prepared candidates. They provide compassionate, skilled job preparation and placement services to ex-offenders, welfare recipients, immigrants, people without homes, and people who have struggled with addiction. Learn more about Jubilee Jobs.

Serve
Assist applicants and job counselors in online applications, mock interviewing, and resume writing. Volunteers must be 18 years of age or older. 2712 Ontario Road NW Washington, DC 20009.

Little Friends for Peace

About
Little Friends for Peace’s mission is to counter violence and contribute to a worldwide culture of peace by sharing skills to prevent, resolve, and transform conflict with individuals, families, teams, and communities. Their vision is the Beloved Community, a world where relationships are based on respect and acceptance, conflicts end in reconciliation, and everyone is safe, cared for, and able to realize their unique potential. They spread their vision through Peace Camps, after-school,  in-school , and adult peace programs. Learn more about Little Friends for Peace.

Serve
Volunteers at Little Friends for Peace will assist with gardening and be invited to play with children that attend Little Friends for Peace programs and live in the neighborhood. Volunteers should bring a hat, gardening gloves if have them, and wear comfortable clothes. Also, they request that volunteers bring equipment for outdoor play such as jump ropes, hula hoops, balls, chalk, and bubbles.

Martha's Table

About
Martha’s table believes that every child deserves the opportunity for their brightest future and a deeply engaged family and community committed to their success. For nearly 40 years, Martha’s Table has worked to support strong children, strong families, and strong communities by increasing access to quality education programs, healthy food, and family supports. Learn more about Martha’s Table.

Serve
Volunteers for Martha’s table will mix and package trail mix for Martha’s Table clients - children and families - to provide healthy snack options. Families are welcome to partake in this volunteer opportunity.

Mary House

About
Mary House began in the home of Bill and Sharon Murphy in 1981. Modeled after Dorothy Day’s Catholic Worker House, Mary’s House receives no funding from the government for the services they provide. Mary House provides transitional housing services, shelter, and support programs for homeless and struggling families at 13 sites in Northeast DC and Takoma Park.  They have a particular focus on helping to resettle families seeking refuge from crises occurring around the world. Learn more about Mary House.

Serve
As Mary House prepares for summer camp, volunteers will help to clean up the House, its yard, and its gardens. There is no age restriction for volunteers.

Prayers in Your Home

About
Parishioners will receive a reflection and a list of people on Holy Trinity's current prayer list. Spend the day praying for those people and the parishioners volunteering during Power of One.

Project Knitwell

About
Project Knitwell offers knitting as a tool to promote wellness and help people cope with stressful situations at more than a dozen hospital and community settings. All of Project Knitwell’s programming is provided by volunteers, and services and supplies are provided free of charge to the people that they serve. They provide knitting instruction and quality materials in an effort to foster, wellness, comfort, and community among those we serve. Learn more about Project Knitwell.

Serve
Volunteers for the Project Knitwell program will meet at Holy Trinity’s Parish Center Library to make starter kits to be used to teach knitting to those facing stressful situations in the hospital and other settings. Volunteers must know how to cast on and knit.

San Miguel School

About
San Miguel School is a Lasallian middle school, dedicated to transforming lives for academically underserved and economically disadvantaged boys in the Washington, D.C. metro area. San Miguel is an independent Catholic school that educates boys in grades 6 through 8 and offers support services to more than 200 alumni. Nearly 90% of their students live at or below the federal poverty level. They are often first in their family to fluently speak English and to attend high school. Learn more about San Miguel School.

Serve
San Miguel School volunteers will assemble food kits, plant flower, clean the outside area at the school, clean desks and walls in the school, and reorganize the kitchen and library at the school. Volunteers of all ages are welcome.

So Others Might Eat (SOME)

About
SOME (So Others Might Eat) is an interfaith, community-based organization that exists to help the poor and homeless of our nation's capital. They meet the immediate daily needs of the people they serve with food, clothing, and healthcare. They help break the cycle of homelessness by offering services, such as affordable housing, job training, addiction treatment, and counseling, to the poor, the elderly, and individuals with mental illness. Each day, SOME is restoring hope and dignity one person at a time. Learn more about SOME.

Serve
Volunteers at SOME will provide a meal program, tutor adults and children, and sort and distribute donated items. Volunteers must be at least 13 years old.

St. Jean Baptiste

About
Holy Trinity began “twinning” with St. Jean Baptiste Parish after Haiti’s catastrophic earthquake in 2010. The parish is in Anse d’Hainault, which is on Haiti’s rural southwestern coast. In October 2016, Hurricane Matthew -- the worst disaster to affect Haiti since the earthquake -- severely impacted this area. Holy Trinity parishioners visit St. Jean Baptiste once or twice a year. Holy Trinity seeks to accompany the people of St. Jean Baptiste in the hope of deepening our relationship with them, promoting the well being of the community and enriching the spiritual life of parishioners in both parishes. Learn more about the St. Jean Baptiste partnership.

Serve
Make friendship bracelets and send accompanying messages to members of our sister parish. All ages welcome; young children should be accompanied by a parent/guardian. Parish Center Neale Room.

Sunday Supper

About
Holy Trinity participates with five other Georgetown churches to offer a weekly Saturday supper to those in need. Since November of 2013 we've been serving men and women each Saturday afternoon and, lately, have been averaging 60 guests.  

Serve
Volunteers with the Sunday Supper program will volunteer on SUNDAY June 16 from 4:15 to 6:15. They will prepare their dish at home (or buy something) and provide some light set-up and clean-up duties. Volunteers must be at least 12 years old, and volunteers under 18 must be accompanied by a parent.

Reflections from "Rejoice and Be Glad," the Papal Call to Holiness

The Pope’s own words: “No one is saved alone, as an isolated individual….I like to contemplate holiness in the patience of God’s people:...in the next-door neighbors, those who, living in our midst, reflect God’s presence. We might call them ‘the middle class of holiness.’ Let us be spurred on by the signs of holiness that the Lord shows us through the humblest members of that people….The Second Vatican Council stated clearly: ‘Strengthened by so many and such great means of salvation, all the faithful, whatever their condition or state, are called by the Lord—each in his or her own way — to that perfect holiness by which the Father himself is perfect.’...The Father’s plan is Christ, and ourselves in him. In the end, it is Christ who loves in us, for holiness is nothing other than charity lived to the full. As a result, the measure of our holiness stems from the stature that Christ achieves in us, to the extent that, by the power of the Holy Spirit, we model our whole life on his….The same distractions that are omnipresent in today’s world also make us tend to absolutize our free time….We need a spirit of holiness capable of filling both our solitude and our service….Jesus clears a way to seeing two faces, that of the Father and that of our brother….or better yet, one alone: the face of God reflected in so many other faces….Holiness, then, is not about swooning in mystic rapture. As Saint John Paul II said: ‘If we truly start out anew from the contemplation of Christ, we must learn to see him especially in the faces of those with whom he himself wished to be identified.’ Matthew 25:35-36 is...a call to recognize him in the poor and the suffering.”

In Holy Trinity’s Power of One Day, parishioners can add to the list given by the Pope: “Our defense of the innocent unborn, for example, needs to be clear, firm and passionate, for at stake is the dignity of a human life, which is always sacred and demands love for each person, regardless of his or her stage of development. Equally sacred, however, are the loves of the poor, those already born, the destitute, the abandoned and the underprivileged, the vulnerable infirm and elderly exposed to covert euthanasia, the victims of human trafficking, new forms of slavery, and every form of rejection.”